0 comments on “Clothing & Equipment Suggestions for Twins and Triplets”

Clothing & Equipment Suggestions for Twins and Triplets

SUGGESTED COMPREHENSIVE LIST OF CLOTHING AND EQUIPMENT FOR A TWIN AND TRIPLET MULTIPLE BIRTH

NOTE: The writers of this Website do not accept any responsibility for the purchase of any of these items nor do they recommend one product over another. In order to ensure the safety of your children, please check out all safety regulations before you make your purchases, especially for secondhand or borrowed items.

aAll of the items contained on this list are suggested only. (Higher number represents triplets.)

You may not need or want each and every item.

  • Car Seats – babies MUST be in properly installed car seats even when being brought home from the hospital. IT’S THE LAW!
  • Appropriate stroller[s] , could be a combination of twin and/or triplet strollers (see Multiple Births Canada’s Strollers Fact Sheet for greater details on stroller brands, types and details.)

JUMELLE: The Best Baby Tracker App Keep easy track of which baby did what, when and for how long. Hints, tips and ideas for coping with 2 or more babies.

  • Single stroller(s) in case you wish to take only one child out at a time
  • Rocking chair
  • One crib can do for at least the first few weeks or possibly months. Purchase other(s) as needed. The babies initially won’t bother each other, and this purchase method spreads out costs and saves on laundry. Be sure that all mattresses are of a good quality.
  • 1 or 2 Playpens- especially important if you have an older child(ren) or large pet. While travelling or visiting, playpens can double as cribs.
  • 1 or 2 Baby Swings. They can take up a lot of room when set up and are difficult to store. Not all children like swings, so try to borrow extra if you need to.
  • Change table – not always essential. A low dresser and padded top will also work fine!
  • Sunshades for vehicle windows
  • 2 or 3 day cradles
  • 3 to 6 dozen cloth diapers (also useful as shoulder burp cloths)
  • 12-18 pairs of plastic pants (or current outer-style plastic pants)
  • 4-6 packages of newborn size disposable diapers
  • Diaper inserts or liners
  • 1 or 2 diaper pails. Diaper pail rinse (1/2 cup white vinegar per half pail full of water as a presoak works as urine neutralizer in diaper pail)
  • Handiwipes – soft wash clothes work just as well and are cheaper in the long run. Some babies have a skin reaction to what is in handiwipes
  • 8-12 receiving blankets
  • 6-9 baby blankets
  • 8-12 bibs
  • 8-10 fitted crib sheets
  • 10-12 quilted pads, plastic on one side
  • 3 per baby, Nighties – you may wish to use nighties until the umbilical cord stubs fall off.
  • 4-6 baby towels, complete with hoods if you wish – you can use regular towels
  • 8-12 small, soft face cloths
  • A few comfortable outfits each for visiting
  • Sweaters, bonnets, bunting bags, socks, booties, hats – amounts dependent upon the season
  • Snowsuit per child. If your babies are born in the Spring, wait until Fall to purchase suits so you will purchase correct sizes.
  • Rectal/digital thermometer
  • Large diaper bag, convenient sized bag or backpack (allowing your hands to be free), for outings – check out the Luggage Department as some carry-on baggage may suit your needs
  • Mild baby soap, Vaseline, Q-tips, rubbing alcohol (for naval), Penaten/Zincofax cream, baby shampoo, mild laundry soap, baby nail scissors, baby oil/lotion (Purchase small sizes initially in order to ascertain whether or not your babies will have any allergies)
  • A batheze leaves your hands free to wash the baby (bath rings are not recommended as the suction cups can easily come detached while in use).
  • A plastic bathtub, should you wish to use one. The large tub area frightens some children and a plastic tub can fit directly into the bathtub to make the area smaller. Can be recycled as the children grow – put on the lawn with water in Summer for play, to hold toys, bathe dolls.
  • Appropriate crib toys and age-appropriate colourful toys.
  • Nightlight(s), baby room monitor
  • Padded head rest per baby (fit into car seats to stop babies’ head from rolling around)
  • 1 or 2 Baby Snuglis, one for each parent and the third baby in a stroller
  • Large horse-shoe shaped pillow for feeding two babies
  • 6 large bottles per baby. These can be used for pumped breast milk or if formula feeding
  • small bottles for pumped breast milk, water or juice
  • 4-cup measuring cup (for measuring water for formula)
  • Bottle and nipple brush
  • Formula is available by the case at drug stores and supermarkets. Shop around for the best prices. Try to make a deal with the store manager to buy larger quantities and receive lower prices. Prices change week to week, even at the same store. These are called ‘Lost Leaders.’
  • 1 baby book per child to record day-to-day milestones, camera/video camera, computer back up stick so photos are not lost

NOTE: Bumper pads and Baby Quilt Comforters are not recommended due to concerns regarding Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) related to crib deaths. This is be a big concern when dealing with premature infants. Their inability to throw off the baby quilt should it cover their face or push away from the bumper pads puts them at great risk of smothering.

0 comments on “Clothing & Equipment List for Quadruplets and Quintuplets”

Clothing & Equipment List for Quadruplets and Quintuplets

A SUGGESTED COMPREHENSIVE LIST OF CLOTHING AND EQUIPMENT FOR QUADRUPLETS AND QUINTUPLETS – MULTIPLE BIRTHS

NOTE: The writers of this fact sheet do not accept any responsibility for the purchase of any of these items nor do they recommend one product over another. In order to ensure the safety of your children, please check out all product safety regulations before you make your purchases and especially when using second hand or borrowed items.

The clothing and equipment items contained on this list are suggested only. (Higher number represents quintuplets.)

You may not need or want every item.

  • Car Seats – It’s the Law! Babies MUST be securely placed in properly installed car seats even when being brought home from the hospital.
  • Appropriate stroller[s] , could be a combination of twin and/or triplet strollers (see Multiple Births Canada’s Strollers Fact Sheet for greater details on stroller brands, types and details.)

JUMELLE: The Best Baby Tracker App Keep easy track of which baby did what, when and for how long. Hints, tips and ideas for coping with 2 or more babies.

  • Single stroller(s) in case you wish to take only one child out at a time
  • Rocking chair
  • Two cribs can do for at least the first few weeks. To spread out expenses purchase additional cribs as the need arises. Babies enjoy being co-bedded and saves on one set of sheets at laundry time. Be sure that all mattresses are of a good quality.
  • 2 or 3 Playpens- especially important if you have an older child(ren) or large pet. While travelling or visiting, playpens can double as cribs.
  • 2 or 3 Baby Swings. Not all children like swings, so try to borrow extra if you need to.
  • Change table – not always essential. A low dresser and padded top will also work fine!
  • Sunshades for vehicle windows
  • 4 or 5 day cradles
  • 7 to 9 dozen cloth diapers (also useful as shoulder burp cloths)
  • 24-36 pairs of outer-style plastic pants
  • 8-10 packages of newborn size disposable diapers
  • Diaper inserts or liners
  • 4 or 5 diaper pails. Diaper pail rinse (1/2 cup white vinegar per half pail full of water as a presoak works as urine neutralizer in diaper pail)
  • Handiwipes – soft wash clothes work just as well and are cheaper in the long run. Some infants have skin reactions to what is in handiwipes.
  • 16-20 receiving blankets
  • 12-15 baby blankets
  • 16-20 bibs
  • 12-14 fitted crib sheets
  • 10-12 quilted pads, plastic on one side
  • 3 per baby, Nighties – you may wish to use nighties until the umbilical cord stubs fall off.
  • 8-10 baby towels
  • 14-16 small, soft face cloths
  • A few comfortable outfits each for visiting
  • Sweaters, bonnets, bunting bags, socks, booties, hats – amounts dependent upon the season
  • Snowsuit per child. If your babies are born in the Spring, wait until Fall to purchase suits so you will purchase correct sizes.
  • Rectal/digital thermometer
  • Large diaper bag, convenient sized bag or backpack (allowing your hands to be free), for outings – check out the Luggage Department as some carry-on baggage may suit your needs
  • Mild baby soap, Vaseline, Q-tips, rubbing alcohol (for naval), Penaten/Zincofax cream, baby shampoo, mild laundry soap, baby nail scissors, baby oil/lotion (Purchase small sizes initially in order to ascertain whether or not your babies will have any allergies)
  • A batheze leaves your hands free to wash the baby (bath rings are not recommended as the suction cups can easily come detached while in use).
  • A plastic bathtub, should you wish to use one. The large tub area frightens some children and a plastic tub can fit directly into the bathtub to make the area smaller. Can be recycled as the children grow – put on the lawn with water in Summer for play, to hold toys, bathe dolls.
  • Age-appropriate colourful toys.
  • Nightlight(s), baby room monitor
  • Padded head rest per baby (fits into car seats to stop baby’s head from rolling around. Especially useful with premature babies. The head rest should not infere with the car seat straps.
  • At least two Baby Snuglis, one for each parent. If you have caretakers, you may wish to purchase/borrow more.
  • 6 large bottles per baby for use with pumped breast milk or if formula feeding
  • small bottles for pumped breast milk, water or juice
  • 4-cup measuring cup (for measuring water for formula)
  • Bottle and nipple brush
  • Formula is available by the case at drug stores and supermarkets. Shop around for the best prices. Try to make a deal with the store manager to buy larger quantities and receive lower prices. Prices change week to week, even at the same store. These are called ‘Lost Leaders.’
  • 1 baby book per child to record day-to-day milestones, camera/video camera, back up stick so photos will not be lost

NOTE: Bumper pads and Baby Quilt Comforters are not recommended due to concerns regarding Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) related to crib deaths. This is be a big concern when dealing with premature infants. Their inability to throw off the baby quilt should it cover their face or push away from the bumper pads puts them at great risk of smothering.

0 comments on “Tips on choosing a stroller for multiples”

Tips on choosing a stroller for multiples

One of a multiple birth families most important pieces of equipment is a stroller to fit, two, three or more babies, and sometimes toddlers as well. It is also one of the most expensive items you will need. Investing in a good stroller is essential for several reasons:

    • multiple births families tend to use their strollers longer, i.e. not unheard of for the kids to be at least 4-years old. It can be because the babies were premature and therefore smaller at birth or because a parent has better control over where the toddlers might wander. If they can be securely fastened into a stroller this stimplifies the outing.
    • it is impossible to carry two or more tired toddlers, so having the stroller available ensures that all tired kids can be transported with a minimum of fuss;
    • a twin or triplet stroller gets A LOT of use and therefore needs to be of a good quality to withstand a lot of handling in and out of vehicles, and the bouncing of two or more active toddlers.
    • it is tempting to buy the cheaper stroller but keep in mind that your stroller will have to earn its keep transporting two, three or more infants and then toddlers.
    • Buying cheaper may find you 18 or so months later buying another one as the first one gave up the ghost.

Multiple birthd - stroller 2     Multiple births -stroller 1

When considering a stroller, here are some important tips to consider prior to purchasing:

    1. Before making a decision, set it up and down in the store. The salesperson can assist in clarifying the oddiities of collapsing and setting up the stroler. Make sure that you can do it quickly and easily.
    2. Talk a walk in the store using your regular stride. Taller parents have been known to knock their skins on one which does not work well with their stride. Is the handle is too short? Hunching over while pushing a stroller will soon become a pain in the shoulders and back!
    3. Ask what is included in the stroller’s price. Not all strollers come with a rain cover, basket or sun roofs. Sometimes these cost extra.
    4. Double wheels can trap ice or rocks or swivel in opposite directions, making pushing it challenging. Larger, single wheels are an asset in Canadian Winters as they move more easily through snow and slush. It is helpful to know if wheels can be easily replaced if necessary. Ask how they clip on and off and how/where to purchase replacement wheels.
    5. Ask which parts, including frame, may have a replacement guarantee.
    6. A full handle length gives the pusher an advantage in controlling the stroller. The umbrella-style handles are sometimes set too far apart and making pushing them when the kiddies are on board a challenge, especially for shorter parents.
    7. Will it fit into the car? More than one family has pushed their new purchase to their car, a nd….it won’t fit in!
    8. There are pros and cons to each seating style of stroller:
    9. Side by side: Pros: allows you easy access to each baby/toddler when needed. The babies can easily interact with each other and most will fit through store doorways.
    10. Cons: The babies can easily interact with each other and as a certain stage, biting can be an issue or clunking of the other with a toy.
    11. Tandem (front and back seated): Pros: fits nicely through doorways and store isles.
    12. Cons: As the babies grow, it can be difficult to lift up over curbs and it may necessitate a trip around the front of the stroller to lift over a curb. It is impossible to quickly reach the baby fartherst from you in time of need. It is helpful to have the farthest seat positioned facing you in order to be aware of what that child is doing. When facing away from you, the child in front may constantly try to stand up to turn around in order to see what s/he might be missing.
    13. Some strollers are called “twin strollers” but in reality they are for a toddler and a newborn. The area for a newborn does not have adequate space for the legs of a toddler and the toddler area may not fully recline to accommodate newborns.
    14. There are wonderful joggers available for twins, triplets and more. If you like to jog, this may be the best stroller for your needs.
    15. Graduated seat heights make it easier to see each baby in the stroller.

Stroller 1     Stroller 2

Now that you have made your decision, here are a few more handy hints from parents:

    1. If your babies are weight discrepant, rotate them with each stroller use so that the stroller wears evenly.
    2. Your stroller is an expensive item. By taking care of it properly, you can ensure that it’s resale value is high. Protect it against the elements and wipe it down if caught in the rain. If you bought your stroller new, it is well looked after (no rust or rips) and it is clean when offered for sale, you might expect to recoup one-half to three-quarters of your original purchase price, depnding on the make of stroller. Advertising through your local Twin and Triplet support chapter (here is a captive audience) will ensure a good resale price.
    3. As noted, expect to use your stroller for up to 4 years, especially if your babies were premature. When the children are older and get tired while on an outing, you will need a place to safely carry them, and the stroller is the perfect place. When they both (all) want to walk, it is a great place to put the diaper bag and/or purchases.
    4. A stroller is expensive but it does make a great collective gift for a Babies Shower or for relatives to get together to make the purchase. They are also available secondhand through local Twin and Triplet support chapters. Sometimes eBay has them for sale as well.
    5. If you need a quick repair for your stroller, check out the local bicycle repair shop. They are usually able to help out.

Places to look for twin, triplet and quadruplet strollers. These are some of the best Canadian Sites I could find. Please note that some sites come and go quite quickly. Happy shopping!

www.babyproofingplus.com
www.mountainbaby.com

….and don’t forget to check eBay and Kijiji. There are some amazing bargains!

0 comments on “Considerations when purchasing or borrowing car seats”

Considerations when purchasing or borrowing car seats

As parents of multiples, it stands to reason that we will need several car seats. Many of us have other children as well, so car seats can be a huge issue.

The following has been put together to give you some hints to consider before you either purchase or borrow any used car seats in attempt to cut expenses. If you are in any doubt about the used car seat you are purchasing or borrowing, don’t do it. After all, your most precious cargo will be using these seats and they are depending upon you to help keep them safe.

NOTE: This information is provided as a set of guidelines. If you have any doubt about any used car seat, check with Transport Canada (contact information below) or the car seat’s manufacturer.

  • Car seatCar seats have carried a manufacturer’s date for some years now. The date is usually stamped on the manufacturer’s label on the back of each car seat. Make sure each car seat is not more than 10 years old. Our Canadian extreme temperatures, over time, break down the plastic in seats and, depending upon how old they are, they may not be as safe as when they were manufactured.
  • If a used car seat is 8, 9 or 10 years old, you may wish to pass onit as multiple birth children tend to use their equipment somewhat longer than a singleton child. In these cases, the ‘best by’ date is nearly past and you may not wish to have to repurchase newer seats at a later date, thereby doubling your expenses.
  • Each seat should have its manufacturer’s instructions showing how to install the seat into a car and how to correctly place a child into that seat. No instructions, then pass it by! If you are purchasing a new car seat, keep the instructions to go along with the car seat when/if you pass it along yourself.
  • Assess the interior of each seat. Are any of the straps worn, buckles missing? If yes, pass on the seat. Is the interior pad torn? If yes, consider the cleanliness of the car seat. Hygiene within a car seat, as well as safety, can be an issue.
  • Check the tether strap for forward-facing car seats, i.e. the strap that anchors the seat to the car frame. It needs to be in good condition.
  • Make sure you know if the used car seat has been in a car crash whether or not there was a child in the seat at the time of the crash.Even in the case of a minor accident, there could be stress fractures to the seat. If you can’t determine an accurate history for the seat, don’t risk using it.
  • If you have a car seat that has been involved in a car crash, even without a child in it, it is now deemed unsafe. Make sure that it is safely destroyed. Don’t risk putting it out at the curbside in case someone else picks it up to use. By the same token, NEVER pick up a car seat from someone else’s curbside.
  • Do notpurchase a new or used car seat manufactured in the United States. American seats do not meet Canadian safety standards.
  • Make sure to read Multiple Birth Canada’s Fact Sheet “Car Seat Tips” for other important information regarding car seats and your children. Learn how to assess when each child is ready to graduate to the next size car seat. Remember that each child may not be ready to graduate to the next size car seat at the same time.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON CAR SEATS, contact Transport Canada at 1-800-333-0371 or visit their Website at www.tc.gc.ca/roadsafety/childsafe/notiavis/en/index.htm

0 comments on “Health Canada Warning Regarding Use of Crib Bumper Pads and Baby Quilts”

Health Canada Warning Regarding Use of Crib Bumper Pads and Baby Quilts

Health Canada recommends in their “Crib Safety” fact sheet that crib bumper pads never be used. This position is supported by the Canadian Paediatric Society, the American Academy of Pediatrics and The Canadian Foundation for the Study of Infant Deaths. The rationale behind this statement is that crib bumper pads, and other products such as quilts, duvets, sheepskins, pillows, stuffed toys, and position maintaining devices, affect the flow of fresh oxygen around the infant and can also pose a smothering hazard if the child’s face is in close contact with them.

Article reprinted with permission from The City of Ottawa.

The American Academy of Pediatrics, in their position paper, hypothesis that certain infants may have a maldevelopment or delay in maturation in a part of their brainstem involved in ventilatory response, chemosensitivity and blood pressure responses. When these infants become compromised (physiologically) during sleep (perhaps from overheating or lack of oxygen as a result of being in contact with or too close to one of the above listed products, or a combination), they are not able to arouse themselves enough to prevent hypoxia and death. The re-breathing of air may in fact be a contributing factor.

Multiple births- bumperCrib bumper pads were first introduced many years ago as a method of protecting infants from head entrapment in unsafe cribs where the slats were too far apart. Since 1986, cribs are manufactured with slat widths that are impossible to get an infant’s head trapped in. Therefore, the bumper pads are no longer necessary.

As well, many years ago when bumper pads were first used, infants were dying as a result of SIDS, but the research as to why this was happening was not as advanced as it is today, and researchers had not yet discovered the link between bumper pads and re-breathing or decreased air flow. Luckily, we have that information today from a vast body of scientific research, and it is very important that we convey this information to parents who question the recommendations.

Parents will also often comment that if they do not use bumper pads, their infant’s hands, feet or legs will get stuck in the slats. This in fact can also happen with the use of bumper pads, as baby’s can get their feet, legs etc. lodged in between the slats either above or below the level of the bumper pad. Although it is possible for the infant to get their hands, leg, etc. caught in between the slats, this event will not result in any serious injury. In fact, the infant will either dislodge the body part themselves, or will make a noise so that the parents can respond and help to remove the part. On the other hand, the risk with bumper pad use is much more serious and can in fact result in the death of the child.

It is also important for parents to be reassured that the risk of sustaining a bruise or injury to the head if the infant rolls into the side of the crib s next to non-existent. The force that would be required to cause such damage is not possible for an infant to produce.

Lynda’s Note:  I used to have website addresses here for further information but due to the fact that it is very difficult to keep up with changing web site locations and addresses, I have removed them since they change so often.  Please Google “bumper pad use, risks” or anything else you can think of to find current resources.