1 comment on “Kangaroo Care For Infants”

Kangaroo Care For Infants

Definition

Kangaroo care has become increasingly popular for newborn infants, especially preterm or low birth weight, whereby an infant is held skin-to-skin against the chest of an adult, usually the parents.  Ideally kangaroo care will begin right after birth and continue for as long as is possible, although short periods of time are also beneficial to babies and parents.

Process

Kangaroo care - mother and twinsMom and/or Dad/partner are usually wearing an over-sized shirt, large hospital gown or loose clothing exposing their chest.  The nearly naked (diaper only) infant is placed directly on mother/father’s exposed chest and the shirt wrapped snugly around baby, drawing him into the parent’s chest where he settles and snuggles.  Instead of a shirt, a warm blanket can be used to cover the infant(s) on parent’s chest to draw her close.

Two babies, and sometimes more, can be held at the same time on a parent’s chest with support from a nurse or the other parent.  If there are tubes and wires on a baby, be sure and check with the nursing staff before going ahead with kangaroo care.  It is also good for the babies to be together.  Every hospital has its own policy regarding Kangaroo Care, so check with your hospital to find out what their policy is.

Benefits for Babies:

  • Father and newborn, kangaroo carehelps stabilize heart rate and regulates breathing
  • improves oxygen saturation levels
  • more rapid weight gain
  • helps maintain baby’s body warmth
  • babies easily accessible for easier breast feeding
  • helps relax and sooth babies, spends less time crying
  • more alert time
  • can hear heart beat, replicating womb experience
  • earlier hospital discharge
  • all newborns benefit from kangaroo care, not just low birth weight and/or preterm infants

Benefits for Parents

  • builds confidence knowing you are offering your infants intimate care and a loving start
  • early closeness to the babies promotes bonding
  • baby easily accessible for breast feeding (when with mother)
  • slows parents down to focus on their infants and less worry about other matters
  • can offer “closure” to having Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) babies

Bibiliography

 

0 comments on “Loss in Multiple Birth”

Loss in Multiple Birth

In spite of everyone’s best efforts, there is a chance that you may lose one, more or all of your babies. In an effort to assist you face this difficult time, to guide you when you have to make certain difficult decisions (e.g. whether or not to see or hold your baby(ies), taking pictures, funeral arrangements) and offer ideas on how to deal with others’ remarks, the following has been prepared. May you find some comfort from these suggestions.

Vanishing Twin (occurs by about 12 weeks gestation)

Vanishing Twin occurs when at least one embryo does not develop probably due to the fact the embryo was not able to properly attach itself to the uterine wall to get the maternal nutrition it needed to properly grow and develop.  The embryo dies and is reabsorbed by the placenta or the mother’s body.  Vanishing Twin is not anyone’s fault.

Miscarriage (occurs up to 20 weeks gestation)

If you have lost your babies through miscarriage, you may feel empty or angry with yourself and let down by your body. You may blame yourself, your actions or attitudes or even that glass of wine or cup of coffee. You may find that friends, family or hospital staff don’t acknowledge the pregnancy or the depth of your grief. Remember, this has been a very real pregnancy for both you and your paratner. You have visualized the babies, ‘taken them for a walk’, ‘bathed and dressed them’, amongst other things.

You might wish to try to find out why your miscarriage occurred. Be prepared for the fact that there might be no definite answers. Try not to feel guilty. Talk openly about your feelings and the babies with a caring person. If desired, maintain some contact with the your local twin and triplet support club until you feel ready to let go.

Stillbirth/Infancy (after 20 weeks gestation)

Prematurity is still the leading cause of death in a multiple birth situation. There is no guarantee against the early delivery of your babies. In spite of the best precautions, it can still occur.

Grief can occur on two levels: at one level, the loss of a unique type of parenting experience; and the other the loss of your baby(ies). The emotions experienced can be varied and sometimes not even feel as if they make any sense: “Did I prefer one baby over the other?”, “Did I really only want one?” Be sure and talk about your feelings with a caring person. You may experience inner struggles as you try to deal with the joy of the birth of one baby and the loss of another. You may wish to push all thoughts of the dead baby from your mind and concentrate on your living baby(ies). You may be subjected to thoughtless remarks from family or friends – ‘you couldn’t have handled triplets anyway.’ ‘At least you still have a baby.’ ‘You have some babies who need you, get on with it!’ It is helpful if you take time to grieve your loss. We cannot move forward until we have grieved what we have lost. Children are not interchangeable and we cannot ignore the death of one because others have survived. Don’t be shy about reminding others that you have lost a baby(ies) and have every right to mourn for him (them).

Some important feedback received from bereaved parents:

  • Name your baby(ies)
  • See your baby(ies) if you can. Hold them, touch them, bathe them and dress them. Take all the time you need. Such contact helps with integrating the fact that your baby is dead. We cannot say ‘good-bye’ before we have said ‘hello’. The majority of bereaved parents find solace, comfort and some healing in seeing their baby(ies). Some grieving parents do not want to see their baby(ies). Don’t be talked into anything that you do not wish to do or which does not feel right for you. Whichever works for you is right way to proceed.
  • Take photos. Take pictures of your babies together and alone, as you wish. The photos can be put away until such time as you feel you might like to look at them or, if you feel unable to take the photos yourself, have a hospital staff member or good friend take some.  Over time, some parents report the photos help acknowledge that their baby(ies) really did exist.  These photos can also become very important for the surviving co-multiple(s) in understanding about their beginnings.
  • Ask any questions of your doctor that you might have. Ask until you have answers that you understand. Be prepared, however, for the fact that some questions may have no answers.
  • Plan the funeral or memorial service as you wish.
  • Don’t keep feelings bottled up inside of you. Talk with a caring person whenever you need. Join a local bereavement support group. This is important for both Mom and Dad/Partner.
  • As the parents, try to spend set aside some time to spend together to share your grief and lost dreams.
  • Be prepared to have ‘set backs’ – this is normal. We are not the same people we were before the death. We need to get used to a new reality. The loss of child stays with us forever and we need to learn how to incorporate our grief into our everyday lives so that we can keep on living. Be prepared to have grief feelings triggered for no seemingly apparent reason. Don’t ignore them. It is only by going through these painful feelings that we can eventually begin to feel any peace.
  • You may wish to think about including older children in the funeral in a meaningful way:  draw a picture, pick out the burial outfit, and such.
  • Try to include the grandparents in some meaningful way in either the funeral or memorial service. They too have a lot to deal with. They have lost a grandchild(ren) and in addition, have not been able to protect their own children from such terrible pain.

There are many good books available on grief.  Check your local Library and perhaps the library of your local twin and triplet support Chapter. Many are available on line at Amazon.com  In addition, Multiple Births Canada has written two booklets on loss and they are available from their Business Office. Multiple Births Canada also has a Loss Support Network which issues a monthly e-newsletter (except December), has confidential e-mail connection between the members and can refer you to appropriate support persons. If you already belong to a member Chapter of Multiple Births Canada, there is no charge to join the Loss Support Network although a donation of your choice to help defray printing and web site costs is greatly appreciated.

Please don’t feel alone in your grief. There are many caring people available to assist you.

Other Support Contacts:

0 comments on “Breastfeeding Twins and Triplets”

Breastfeeding Twins and Triplets

Breastfeeding twins and triplets? Yes, you can! Many women have successfully breastfed their twin babies, some for over two years.

We are all well aware of the benefits of breastmilk for babies and many wonderful and supportive ‘how to’ books have been written on the subject (some of those books are listed after this article). Even if your babies are premature, you can still breastfeed them. You can pump and take your milk into the hospital for feeding to your babies’. The nutritional content of each mother’s breastmilk is best suited for her babies’ needs. (Source: Side by Side, Breastfeeding Multiples – video, Calgary Foothills Pipeline Hospital).

Check lower down this page for some hints on breastfeeding triplets.

When preparing for breastfeeding, here are some helpful hints:

  • Properly prepare for breastfeeding by reading a general information book on breastfeeding.
  • Discuss your wishes with your partner before birth. It is important that you both have a commitment to breastfeeding and your partner be fully supportive.
  • Get together with other women who have successfully breastfed twins and triplets. Compare notes, pick up hints, ideas and shortcuts. Your local community may offer a breastfeeding class geared towards multiples. Check with your local Health Unit. You may also connect with your local La Leche League Group for support both before and after the babies’ birth.
  • If possible, put your babies to the breast immediately after birth. If you are unable to do so, make sure you have made prior arrangements with your doctor and hospital nurse staff and that they are fully aware of your commitment to breastfeeding. Make your intentions to breastfeed clear and make arrangements to pump and collect milk until such time as you will have the babies with you and can feed them yourself. A double pump is a great investment and can save you a lot of time. Remember: Both you and the babies are learning about breastfeeding. Babies are not born knowing how to suckle. You will need to work together (perhaps with the assistance of a Lactation Consultant while in the hospital) to learn how to breastfeed successfully.
  • It is very common to have one baby who latches on quicker or more easily than the other. Put that baby to the breast first and then you will have ample time to work with settling the other baby who may need a little more coaxing and attention with latching. Another excellent investment is a horse-shoe shaped nursing pillow. Make sure the pillow you purchase is large enough to hold the two babies together. Some of the pillows available in stores are smaller and made for nursing only one baby at a time.
  • Your milk supply will be influenced by several factors: 1) how often you feed the babies (and/or pump); 2) how often you rest; and 3) the stress levels you are experiencing. You will produce an appropriate volume of milk to meet the babies’ demand (the supply meets the demand) and it is equally important to be sure and get enough rest and to limit the stress levels in your day in order to assist you in producing milk (if the beds don’t get made today, so be it!).
  • If you arrive home and have difficulties latching a baby or you or your babies are having difficulties, don’t be shy. Call your local Health Unit and find out where Breastfeeding Support Clinics are held, call your local Twin/Triplet support Chapter, Lactation Consultant or La Leche League Group. Get the help you need to assist you and your babies.
  • It may be that you will experience some nipple soreness when nursing two babies. If you stop nursing, the soreness will only return after the babies begin nursing again. Try nursing for shorter periods of time, but more often. If you are experiencing some pain, it is usually associated with poor positioning. Remove your baby, reposition him and try again. If you continue to experience nipple soreness, seek out some guidance from one of the groups mentioned above.
  • Babies hit a growth spurt any where from 3 to 6 weeks of age (and not necessarily each at the same time) and then at regular intervals of about 6 weeks each after that, depending upon each individual baby. Don’t worry if it appears that you are ‘running out of milk’ as it is more likely the babies are feeding more often due to a growth spurt. Soon the increased demand will meet up with the supply and regular feeding intervals will again develop. Their growth rate slows down at about 3 or 4 months.
  • Do not assign one baby exclusively to a breast because: 1) they may be uneven suckers and very shortly you will have a lopsided shape due to their uneven sucking patterns. Alternating the babies on each breast will even out any different sucking patterns; and very importantly 2) when a baby is assigned to only one breast, the baby’s upper eye gets over worked, while the one below can become lazy and not react properly to stimulous.
  • If you find that one or both of your babies is having difficulties with one feeding position, try a different one. One Mom of twins reported that her son would not breastfeed if he was ‘under’ his sister. The weight of his sister, while using the cradlehold position, was something that he would not tolerate. When she switched to the football hold, which allowed each baby to be free of touching one another, he settled right down and breastfeeding went extremely well.
  • Your babies should eat initially every 2-1/2 to 3 hours and you will need to nurse at least 8 times a day for several weeks. Some babies need to nurse more often.
  • Triplets – For Moms wishing to breastfeed triplets, a suggestion to assist in building up your milk supply is to put two babies each to a breast for 10 minutes and the third baby on each breast for five minutes, at each feed. At the next feed, rotate the turn of the third baby so that each baby has a turn being on the breast within the first 10 minutes. Some Moms have reported a reasonable amount of success in building up their milk supply by using this rotating system. It is agreed that it is difficult to exclusively breastfeed three babies and I know of only one family who successfully did so exclusively for nearly two years. However, I am aware of several triplet families who have very happily partially breast-fed their babies for different durations of time.

Breastfeeding Multiples – Positions

You can be assured that your babies are feeding well if:

  • there are 6 to 8 soaking wet cloth diapers or 5 to 6 wet disposable diapers per baby in 24 hours during the first six weeks;
  • each baby is having 2 to 5 bowel movements in 24 hours during the first six weeks;
  • they are feeding at least 8 to 12 times a day for a duration of 10 to 40 minutes. Duration and number of feeding times per day will vary with each baby.

Breastmilk can be stored at room temperature for about 10 hours; in a refrigerator for about 8 days; freezer compartment with a separate door for 3-4 months and in a separate deep freeze for 6 months.*

Other Resources for Breastfeeding Your Multiples

I love the drawings in some of these books. It is very helpful to actually ‘see’ the positions so they can be interpretted correctly and find the ones that will work best for you and your babies.

*Source: Mothering Multiples: Breastfeeding & Caring for Twins or More!! by Karen Kerkhoff Gromada, La Leche League International (a great book, easily understood and takes you through the steps of breastfeeding, what ‘problems’ to look for and how to correct them, the important role of partner and lots more!)

The Joy of Twins and other multiple births by Pamela Patrick Novotny, Crown Trade Paperback Inc. (includes excellent diagrams of possible positions for simultaneous feeding)

Double Duty by Christina Baglivi Tinglof, Contemporary Books (also has some great illustrations for feeding positions. Walks you clearly through the steps of breastfeeding and has a list of ‘5 Top Breastfeeding Boo Boos’.)

Multiple Blessings by Betty Rothbart, M.S.W., Hearst Books (Has a Chapter devoted to breastfeeding, including feeding the babies simultaneously or back to back, creating a peaceful environment for breastfeeding and more! Also has excellent drawings showing different breastfeeding positions.)

0 comments on “The No-Cry Discipline Solution: Book Review”

The No-Cry Discipline Solution: Book Review

Elizabeth Pantley has, thankfully, added another book to her “No-Cry” series. This latest one offers discipline solutions for toddlers and children, aged 2 to 8 years. All types of potentially difficult situations are covered such as bedtimes, tantrums, not brushing teeth, hitting, bitting, meal times, inappropriate language use and more. She covers not only what the child might be feeling but also the parent’s feelings. A very helpful section looks at anger, what it means, possible triggers and how our own anger can affect the situation and sometimes make things worse. Pantley offers useful suggestions on keeping one’s own emotions in check, turning the situation around with distracting methods (make a song out of what you want done, use humour) and offers appropriate consequences when or if necessary.

The No-Cry Discipline Solution, Elizabeth Pantley, 2007, McGraw Hill, softcover, 235 pages

My favorite section has to be Part 4: Specific Solutions for Everyday Problems.

When my girls were small (twins and a singleton 22 months their elder), I just didn’t have time to read psychologically-based, drawn-out solutions for situations which generally had one child, one adult and the general message “follow this advice and all will be well.” Yeah right! Not in my house where the parents were outnumbered by little ones feeding off of each other’s behaviour.

I needed quick, helpful, supportive feedback with several possible suggestions to consider in turning things around. Flying by the seat of your pants and/or “learning as you go” doesn’t always equal good parenting skills.

Pantley clearly and concisely states a situation, for example Sibling Fights. Each begins with a story from a frustrated parent. Pantley asks us to Think About It (in this case Sibling Fights) and addresses what such fights can mean for the child. She then offers step by step ideas on What to Do and, perhaps more importantly,What Not to Do.

Pantley cross-references to other areas of the book for additional suggestions. In this case, Biting Other Children; Bossiness, Hitting, Kicking and Hair Pulling; Playtime Behaviour. Most topics are covered in two pages, making it quick and simple to grab the book (topics are alphabetically listed), peruse the appropriate area, absorb some techniques and get back to the home situation, all in a timely fashion. That’s my kinda guide!

If you have kids aged 2-8 years, this book is a must have. I hope that Pantley will soon add a “No-Cry Discipline” focused on preteens and teens.

Lynda P. Haddon

0 comments on “Raising Multiple Birth Children”

Raising Multiple Birth Children

Although the rate of multiple births has skyrocketed in recent years, many parents of twins and triplets find that they are struggling to cope with the emotional, psychological, and financial pressures of parenting more than one baby. This book by William and Sheila Laut is a survival guide for the parents of multiples. It contains a compendium of tips and techniques collected from parents of multiple births across the country.

Raising Multiple Birth Children By William and Sheila Laut, 1999.

The chapters include:

Raising Multiple Birth Children1) “Congratulations, and Fasten Your Seat Belt!” focusing on pregnancy
2) “‘Time To Feather Your Nest’–A Guide to What You Will Need”
3) “‘Will They Ever Sleep through the Night?’–The First Six Months,” addressing sleeping, feeding, colic, and finding help
4) “‘Life Will Never Be the Same!’–Your New Lifestyle,” concerning parent adjustment
5) “‘Are They Natural?’,” on responding to personal questions
6) “‘Bringing Home the Bacon’–Financial Issues”
7) “‘Who Are All These Little People?’–The Second and Third Years,” focusing on teaching social skills, discipline, and toilet training
8) “‘The Instant Family Doesn’t Come with Instructions’–Making It Work and Building Quality Relationships”
9) “‘Can We Come Too?’–Around Town or Around the World–Traveling with Multiples”
10) “‘Another Year Already?’–Birthdays and Holidays”
11) “‘Quick, Give Me an Idea, FAST!’,” including tips regarding shopping and cleaning up
12) “‘It’s Gonna Take More Than Sit-Ups’–Tummy Tucks,” concerning plastic surgery
13) “‘I Miss the Kids Already and They’re Only Sleeping’,” containing parents’ reflections on their children’s growth
14)”Where To Turn for Information and Support.”

I haven’t yet read this book on raising multiple birth children by the parents of triplets, but it has come highly recommended to me. With the birth of triplets, William and Sheila Laut went from DINK (double income, no kids) to SINK (single income, numerous kids) desperate for advice, but finding little. Their book on how to raise multiple children is packed with practical tips for parents raising twins, triplets, quadruplets, and more. They also include suggestions for getting organized, baby gear you will need, coping with sleep deprivation (I like it already!), gift ideas, funny stories, (we can always use those) and more!

1 comment on “Mothering Multiples: Book Review”

Mothering Multiples: Book Review

Mothering Multiples: Breastfeeding Twins, Triplets or More covers every possible breastfeeding topic. A mother of multiple babies will likely have an assortment of questions. Can she produce enough milk? How will she coordinate feedings? Is breastfeeding even an option? The simple answer: Yes!

Kerkhoff Gromada offers valuable information with an emphasis on breastfeeding and attachment-style parenting. All aspects of caring for multiple babies are addressed. These include possible complications of pregnancy, preparing for a multiple birth, coping with newborns who might need to spend time in a NICU, establishing a milk supply for multiple babies, adjusting as a couple, and caring for toddler multiples.

Mothering Multiples: Breastfeeding Twins, Triplets or More, Karen Kerkhoff Gromada from La Leche League

mothering multiplesMothering Multiples provides valuable information with an emphasis on breastfeeding and attachment-style parenting. It features various aspects of caring for multiple babies, including possible complications of pregnancy, and preparing for a multiple birth.

An encouraging and essential read for breastfeeding, Mothering Multiples also contains excellent photos and topics of interest.

About the author: Karen Kerkoff Gromada has worked with thousands of mothers of multiples as a La Leche League Leader for more than 30 years and is a registered nurse and lactation consultant. A popular speaker on the topic of multiples, she has been published in the Journal of Human Lactation and various nursing journals. She co-authored Keys to Parenting Multiples for Barrons Educational Series and was a pioneer columnist for TWINS magazine.

0 comments on “A Doctor’s Guide to a Healthy and Happy Multiple Pregnancy”

A Doctor’s Guide to a Healthy and Happy Multiple Pregnancy

Expecting two or more? Dr. Franklin has a light-hearted, easy to understand writing style, generously laced with humour. Her book takes you through each stage of the pregnancy. She includes chapters on learning the news that you’re having multiples, “…and What To Do About It”, she addresses issues you might expect to face in each trimester of your pregnancy, focusing on nutrition, exercise, and preparing for the babies.

Expecting Twins, Triplets, and More: A Doctor’s Guide to a Healthy and Happy Multiple Pregnancy, Rachel Franklin, M.D., M.O.M.* (*Mother of Multiples), 2005, St. Martin’s Griffin, N.Y., 221 pages

Expecting Twins, Triplets, and More is like having a friend, who also happens to be a doctor, share her experience and expertise to help you best take care of yourself and your babies at this very special time. Dr. Rachel Franklin’s practical wisdom helps you understand the unique circumstances of multiple pregnancy and birth. Throughout and after your pregnancy,  Expecting Twins, Triplets, and More will act as an invaluable resource on what to expect, how to cope, and how to enjoy the journey.

Here are some of the topics Dr. Franklin covers in her book:

  • Telling family, friends, and coworkers the news
  • Choosing a doctor
  • Exercising and eating well
  • Coping strategies trimester by trimester
  • Preparing for labor and delivery
  • Understanding potential complications and their solutions
  • Navigating the NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit)
  • Celebrating the births and bringing home the babies
0 comments on “Your Premature Baby: The First Five Years (Book Review)”

Your Premature Baby: The First Five Years (Book Review)

An excellent Canadian book offering detailed information regarding your premature baby. Why does premature birth happen? What can you do? How a premature baby may behave (looking at the body language of a premature baby), how the hospital can help, bringing them home, and feeding a premature baby are some of the topics covered in detail.

The photographs of these special babies are simply fabulous. This book would be a great resource for those with a premature baby.

Your Premature Baby: The First Five Years by Nikki Bradford, 2003, Firefly Books, 208 pages

premature babyYour Premature Baby is the definitive guide to every aspect of nurturing a child who is born too soon. Reassuring and frank, it is the only book that informs and guides parents right from their baby’s too-early birth into the growing years.

Features of this book:

  • Exactly how prematurity affects a baby
  • Explains hospital terms, procedures, treatments, and equipment
  • What to expect as your baby progresses through treatment and procedures
  • Gives advice for coping practically and emotionally
  • Help and ideas for parents from when their baby comes home up to age 5
  • Discusses the latest research into the causes of prematurity and its preventions
  • Offers a wide variety of resources for further information and support
0 comments on “The no-cry potty training solution: Book Review”

The no-cry potty training solution: Book Review

Here are two goals which can bring joy to a parent’s heart: “sleeping through the night” and “toilet trained.” For the latter, Elizbeth Pantley has scored again with her newest book on potty training. It isn’t unheard of for parents to find themselves in unpleasant, close enocunters of the potty-training kind when trying to train their toddlers. It doesn’t have to be so and Pantley gives us suggestions, not the least of which is to recognize the signs of each child’s readiness to be trained. If they are not physically ready and able, training can quickly move to a battle of wills, with no winners insight.

Gentle ways to help your child say good-bye to diapers, Elizabeth Pantley, McGraw Hill, 2007, 174 pages, softcover

Right at the beginning, Pantley sets out a Readiness Quiz so that we know what signs of readiness to look for in our children. She addresses topics such as keeping it natural, making it a game, getting to the bathroom quickly (kids tend to leave it to the last second and when they say they “need to go,” time is of the essence), bathroom safety, how to teach your child to wipe properly and wash their hands afterwards.

There is a chapter on bed-wetting which is extremely helpful. Bed-wetting is more common with boys and during the night, the kidneys may not be sending appropriate messages to the brain to signal the need to go and/or the bladder is not fully developed enough to go through the night. Bed-wetting can sporadically last for years, or not. She provides constructive ways to handle bed-wetting and to help keep your child dry, without them losing their self-esteem in the process. Pantley even includes some suggestions for toilet training children with special needs.

While her book focuses on training singleton toddlers, there reference about training twins and more. She gives us notice that our children may not be ready to train at the same time – and haven’t we heard that before in other contexts! – and reminds us not to compare them regarding successes and failures – yet another common theme for parents with multiples. Each child having their own potty ensures that when the time is right, there will be no waiting in line for a turn and perhaps subsequent accidents.

While toilet training is long-past with my own children, I really appreciated Pantley’s easy writing style, identifying the challenges and offering suggestions, and positive approach to a topic which can be a challenge for parents as well as toddlers. She takes the pain out of it all for everyone and if your children are nearly ready to toilet train, this is one book you don’t want to miss reading.

0 comments on “Blender Baby Food”

Blender Baby Food

For parents wishing to make their own baby foods or wishing to have some fun choices to offer toddlers, this book on blender baby food is a must have! The sections of this book are broken down into chronological sections, from when babies need to begin solid foods through 12 months and older, and includes suggested meal plans for each age. There are 125 delicious baby food recipes included for beginning solids, with hints and tips in the margins on how to “upgrade” each recipe for older children.

Blender Baby Food, Nicole Young and Nadine Day, 2005, Robert Rose Inc., 189 Pages

baby foodThe authors begin with steps on how to recognize when your babies are ready to begin solids, address food consistency at each age and stage, answer safety with food issues (such as with eggs), choking hazards, storing, freezing and thawing prepared foods and offer a list of the equipment you can expect to use when preparing your own baby food. There is even a section covering salt, sugars and The Picky Eater. It couldn’t be easier.

Blender Baby Food guides readers through the process of making their own baby food. The blender is an easy, no fuss way to offer new flavours in a baby-friendly texture. Even after a child begins to eat table food, there is always an occasion for a fruit smoothie or a nutritious blended dip.

Young and Day include three reasons for parents to make their own baby food:

    • 1) The ingredients are all hand selected, assuring healthy and wholesome meals
    • 2) Parents can easily tailor the texture to their baby’s preferences
    • 3) It will help shape a baby’s tastes so he or she can appreciate fresh foods

The book also includes meal plans, helpful tips and techniques and even advice on storing and freezing baby food. Using this comprehensive cookbook, parents will quickly discover that giving their baby the best nutritional advantage is its own reward.

Another great point – it’s a Canadian book!